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Attempt to re-create geggenpressing

Adrindrataa

Member
Sep 9, 2017
4
0
0
25
First of all, I want to reminds you that Gegenpressing (or Counter Pressing) is a tactic where you attack your opponent, loses the ball (usually in wide area of the pitch), win the ball as high as possible, start a quick counter attack.
my input is:
1. Opposition Instructions:
gegenpressing is mainly about pressing opponent's fullbacks, centre backs, and defensive midfielders. this achieved by closing down DR,DL,DC,DM,WBL, and WBL. you might want to tackle them harder if your players (especially Wingers, Attacking Midfielders, and Striker have about 10 or 12 in tackling) as for the rest of the opposition, it might be better to just mark them and show them to their weaker foot. your OI is (and will) expose your defense from left and right.

2. Team Shape:
you might want to move your Right Central Midfielder to Central Attacking Midfielder spot in Supporting Attacking Midfielder role. This will allow you to press the Defensive Midfielder and having an extra man at the end of the cross. if you want to play an authentic Klopp's Gegenpressing, you might want to the Wingers as Inside Forwards at attacking role. and plays Inverted Wing Backs or Support Full backs. Klopp plays Mane and Salah that is a natural attacking Inside Forwards to cut inside and attack on-the-ball fullbacks. as for the fullback, Klopp plays Inverted Wing Backs or Fullbacks depends on the opposition. the IWB is good against team with solid midfield that press high, but the Support Full Backs is usually better since they help the pressing and stays just behind the Inside Forwads to cross.

3. Team Instruction:
put the Width into Balanced. so your team have more flexibility in when and where to play, this also open up options since your team won't focus solely in the middle of the park and able to send a long ball out wide to stretch the play. push your defense line up and your closing down in the match (or permanently) if you think your player doesn't press fast enough, Work Ball Into Box will help your Inside Forwards open up spaces for overlapping Fullbacks and intentionally losing the ball closer to the box and in a more dangerous position. Klopp usually exploits his midfield to retain control while the flank is looking for spaces.

Lastly, you might want to reconsider your tackling approach as Get Stuck In without good tacklers will only result in cards, and Gegenpressing's tackles mostly come from the Flanks that doesn't have naturally high tackles.

Hope this helps!
 

Bulgarien

Member
Feb 2, 2015
25
0
0
33
First of all, I want to reminds you that Gegenpressing (or Counter Pressing) is a tactic where you attack your opponent, loses the ball (usually in wide area of the pitch), win the ball as high as possible, start a quick counter attack.
my input is:
1. Opposition Instructions:
gegenpressing is mainly about pressing opponent's fullbacks, centre backs, and defensive midfielders. this achieved by closing down DR,DL,DC,DM,WBL, and WBL. you might want to tackle them harder if your players (especially Wingers, Attacking Midfielders, and Striker have about 10 or 12 in tackling) as for the rest of the opposition, it might be better to just mark them and show them to their weaker foot. your OI is (and will) expose your defense from left and right.

2. Team Shape:
you might want to move your Right Central Midfielder to Central Attacking Midfielder spot in Supporting Attacking Midfielder role. This will allow you to press the Defensive Midfielder and having an extra man at the end of the cross. if you want to play an authentic Klopp's Gegenpressing, you might want to the Wingers as Inside Forwards at attacking role. and plays Inverted Wing Backs or Support Full backs. Klopp plays Mane and Salah that is a natural attacking Inside Forwards to cut inside and attack on-the-ball fullbacks. as for the fullback, Klopp plays Inverted Wing Backs or Fullbacks depends on the opposition. the IWB is good against team with solid midfield that press high, but the Support Full Backs is usually better since they help the pressing and stays just behind the Inside Forwads to cross.

3. Team Instruction:
put the Width into Balanced. so your team have more flexibility in when and where to play, this also open up options since your team won't focus solely in the middle of the park and able to send a long ball out wide to stretch the play. push your defense line up and your closing down in the match (or permanently) if you think your player doesn't press fast enough, Work Ball Into Box will help your Inside Forwards open up spaces for overlapping Fullbacks and intentionally losing the ball closer to the box and in a more dangerous position. Klopp usually exploits his midfield to retain control while the flank is looking for spaces.

Lastly, you might want to reconsider your tackling approach as Get Stuck In without good tacklers will only result in cards, and Gegenpressing's tackles mostly come from the Flanks that doesn't have naturally high tackles.

Hope this helps!
Thank you for the comprehensive answer!
 

Mathbra

Member
Apr 5, 2011
7
0
0
31
Hi! Excuse me for the long post but I thought I'd go more in depth on this one. This is a very pro-active strategy, while "counter" is a very reactive one. So first of all, I recommend you change your mentality to controlling or attacking.

The main thing we should start with is turning tight marking off, both in the main tactics screen and opposition instruction. With gegenpressing your entire team is actually attacking and shifting towards the ball, not the players. If you use man marking ("mark tighter") then your players will simply stand next to the player in their zone. So you want no man marking and turn "closing down" up to maximum. "Very fluid" shape will help you as your entire team is expected to defend.

Another thing you need to do for this to work optimally is look at your opponent's team to find players who are good on the ball and players who are bad on the ball. The player (or players) with the best passing and decision making skills, concentration etc, you actually want to mark tightly as this will 1. make it hard for their best players to move the ball, and 2. because this will "invite" the opposing team to pass to the players who are bad on the ball. These players will make more mistakes. Most typically the weak players will be central backs, full backs, defensive midfielders or young players. (Another tip is using the "body language" box in-game to see which players are nervous) You should highlight these players in the opposition instructions with "never mark tight" as this will further invite your opponents to pass to them. You leave them open, but when they receive the ball, your team will attack that player and hopefully he will make a mistake.

All this should make your FM team create numerical advantage in defence by attacking the ball, double teaming a lot. Now we should look at positional advantage. In a strong pressing game, the sidelines are our friends. If we push the opposing wingers to the sidelines, then they will have less space to move. By forcing opponents to their outside foot, they will naturally drift towards the sideline. That means that in the "opposition instructions" screen, you should "show" an opposing right back to their right foot, an opposing left back to their left foot, and an opposing right winger to their right foot, and so on... Push them to the outside and you will have an easier time pressing with the help of the sideline. Also changing your team shape to a more narrow one will help this. Just be careful because if you play too narrow your opponents will just run around you and cross from the byline. I see you already set a high defensive line, which is good. This will make your team more compact and easier for your players to get support if your pressing fails. I would even consider changing it to a "very high" defensive line. Just be aware faster strikers may punish you for this.

Your team should ideally have excellent work rate, stamina, natural fitness to be able to deploy this tactic over a whole season. Also technical ability is great for playing yourself out of these tight spaces you inevitably will find yourself in.

Another interesting thing is that if your opponents have players with weak decision-making and playmaking in their defence, you can turn "prevent short GK distribution" off. That way the GK will play it short to these players, and then your team will push them to make a mistake. If the defence is great on the ball, then it makes more sense to leave "prevent..." on as this will force the goalie to take greater risks and play it past them.
 

Mathbra

Member
Apr 5, 2011
7
0
0
31
Here's an interesting illustration from a Marcelo Bielsa masterclass. Being one of the most influential managers ever, he's well known for his extreme pressing style.

On the left column you see potential formations your opposing teams could line up in. On the right is the formation we should ideally use to make sure we have maximum cover, which will make pressing easier. All these formations make it so your opponents will have a hard time out-numbering you anywhere on the pitch. Bielsa and Guardiola like to have players who can play multiple positions, so that they can make adjustments to their formation mid-game if so needed.

Keep in mind that even they don't employ all these formations. Dramatically changing your formation mid-season will only hurt you. Let's for example just pick the three most common formations and see what we need to counter them. 4-2-1-3 (aka 4-2-3-1), 4-3-3 and 4-2-4 (aka 4-4-2). On the right column we can see we would ideally play 4-3-3, 4-2-1-3 and 3-4-3 to counter these formations. So I would typically just train these three formations as this will probably line up well against 90% of teams in our league. I also try to make sure my team can shapeshift into any of these formations mid-game by having flexible players.

 

Bulgarien

Member
Feb 2, 2015
25
0
0
33
Here's an interesting illustration from a Marcelo Bielsa masterclass. Being one of the most influential managers ever, he's well known for his extreme pressing style.

On the left column you see potential formations your opposing teams could line up in. On the right is the formation we should ideally use to make sure we have maximum cover, which will make pressing easier. All these formations make it so your opponents will have a hard time out-numbering you anywhere on the pitch. Bielsa and Guardiola like to have players who can play multiple positions, so that they can make adjustments to their formation mid-game if so needed.

Keep in mind that even they don't employ all these formations. Dramatically changing your formation mid-season will only hurt you. Let's for example just pick the three most common formations and see what we need to counter them. 4-2-1-3 (aka 4-2-3-1), 4-3-3 and 4-2-4 (aka 4-4-2). On the right column we can see we would ideally play 4-3-3, 4-2-1-3 and 3-4-3 to counter these formations. So I would typically just train these three formations as this will probably line up well against 90% of teams in our league. I also try to make sure my team can shapeshift into any of these formations mid-game by having flexible players.

Thank you for the good answer!!!
 

Mathbra

Member
Apr 5, 2011
7
0
0
31
3-3-1-3 would look like this in FM. I think the narrow version is more applicable as usually the opposing 4-3-1-2 will be narrow, too. This is a good formation against teams without wingers/side midfielders but with two strikers. If they do have wingers, as you can see, they have all the space in the world behind our wingers. In this scenario, if you HAD to use a 3-3-1-3, you can use the wide version. We'd likely struggle in the central midfield, but it could still kind of work by playing very fluid and bringing down your striker to mark on defense.
View attachment 80788View attachment 80789
 
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