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Which tactic should I make next? Vote now! [POLL]

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Hello FM-Base,

I've decided I'm going to exert my concentrations on to a new project. It consists of building some fairly unrecognizable tactics based around the 1900s and trying to make them work in this modern era.

Here is the compilation of 3 different tactics, you can vote on the one you'd like me to attempt and I will give it a go, to the best of my abilities!

And before anyone asks, yes you can help me by modifying my creations in an attempt to improve them, and yes I will fully credit you for your efforts.


The List:

The 2-3-5(1900) CURRENT VOTES: 4

View attachment 365909

This formation, also known as the Pyramid, or the classic formation, as it was used for 50 years after its invention, has only two defenders. Three midfielders and five forwards should be sufficient evidence to show that this is an attack-oriented formation. Attacking plays generally began from the center-half, who had usually two options: to pass to one of the five forwards or to dribble forward himself. The defence is manned solely by the defenders (naturally) and thewing-halves, the two outside midfielders, helped out by marking the opposing wingers.
The Danubian style, based loosely on the 2-3-5 and used successfully by the Austrian, Hungarian and Czechoslovakian national teams in the 1930s, was only different in one aspect. The passes used by the players were strictly kept on the ground, and no aerial passes were used.
Advice on the 2-3-5: This formation requires defenders that have good stamina, good sense of positioning, and good tackling skills, as they have to do the defending of the goal alone. The wing-halves should be able to run fast and pass well, and possess some amount of trickery, for they will have to outwit the opposition wingers.The centre-half should have a great control of the ball, superb sense of positioning and good passing. Wingers have to be creative, have a decent aptitude in dribbling down the flanks, and be able to beat defenders with ease, for they are the suppliers of the goals, and must beat the opposing wing-halves to do so. Great passing is another important asset for the winger, as he has to find the centre-forward in good positions to enable him to score. The centre-forward must be one man who is able to get the goals; people who can put the ball over the bar from two metres out need not apply. The centre-forward must also have a strong shot and good passing, so that in case he gets into trouble, he can pass it out to the wingers to try again.


The Catenaccio(1947) 1-3-3-3
CURRENT VOTES: 3

View attachment 365910

In 1947, Nereo Rocco became the new coach of Triestina, a small club in Italy's Serie A. Triestina was then only barely surviving in the league. Rocco's catenaccio system saw Triestina shooting up to second in the league later that season.
Catenaccio at its most attacking is played with a 1-3-3-3 formation. The most important part of the catenaccio was the focus on defence. Though not as outright defensive as the verrou, this defensive alignment was also important -- it led to football's darkest era (in Italy, anyway) when sterile, goalless matches were produced.
Three of the fullbacks had man-to-man marking duties, and the deep centre-back, the solitary "1" behind the defence, would be the libero, the free man. This libero would have no marking duties, and would patrol the backline to cover up in case a fullback made a mistake. Almost all of the game was spent with long balls probing the defence, or sending only the forward line to attack, so that there would be enough players left to defend if a counterattack from the opposition developed. At its most defensive, a catenaccio team can even play with a 1-4-3-2 or 1-4-4-1 formation.
Advice on the catenaccio: Catenaccio was a very wary, cautious form of play and is not recommended except when you are David against Goliath... but then again, if you already have your own rather successful style, stick to it.



Total Football(1970s) CURRENT VOTES: 5

View attachment 365911

Pioneered (in the World Cup, at any rate) by the Dutch and the Germans in the 1974 World Cup in West Germany, the team plays as one giant unit. There are no fixed roles in a team (except the goalkeeper of course.) When a fullback has the ball and thinks he can start an attack, he can move up on his own, and any player, even a forward, can help out by moving back to fill up the gap in defense. In other words, the team is not divided into defenders, midfielders and forwards; anyone can do anything (intelligently, of course) he wishes to.
However, as total football is nothing but 10 skilful players having fun, the Dutch team lost its light springy image in 1978 without Johan Cruyff, star of the 1974 Dutch World Cup team, who announced he would not play in that World Cup. Franz Beckenbauer played in the libero position for Germany, and often moved up to join in the attacks, thus bewildering the opposition fullbacks who already had their own man-marking assignments. The German flavour was also diluted when Franz Beckenbauer followed Cruyff and "retired" for the '78 World Cup.
Advice on using total football: This style of play is not really a formation. Rather, the advantages of using this against an opponent is that the opposition will spend their time trying to figure out what tactics your team is using while your team can take advantage of the confusion and (hopefully) score! This should only be used, however, if the communication and rapport between the players is very good, and that most players have above average ball skills. Otherwise passes might go off target, possession might be lost, and big gaps might be created that the opposition can use to devastating effect. In other words, this is an all-or-nothing formation... either it works well, or it backfires badly. Not much of an in-between.



So which one will it be? You decide!
Get voting now! :D


 
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Catenaccio because I think it could actually work well whereas the others would be very hard to produce.
 
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The 2-3-5 (1900) Magical Magyars !!! XD
 

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Always fancied seeing a 3-3-4

CB
CB
CB
CM
CM
CM
LW
RW
ST
ST

or even

CB
CB
CB
CM
CM
CM
ST
ST
ST
ST

:)
 
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Votes acknowledged.
 
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I've decided to make them all!

Starting with the 2-3-5.
 
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Now the other guy has made a Catenaccio I reckon for for the 2-3-5.

I would say total football as I think it's more workable, but with a total football tactic you need such complete footballers and I like tactics that can be used to make weaker teams perform above their level so I might as well support something completely different!
 
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Now the other guy has made a Catenaccio I reckon for for the 2-3-5.

I would say total football as I think it's more workable, but with a total football tactic you need such complete footballers and I like tactics that can be used to make weaker teams perform above their level so I might as well support something completely different!
His doesn't have a Libero' lol.
 
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