Books

Kris

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Sep 17, 2005
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Hello,

I am going on a mini tour of North America in a few weeks and I’m looking for some good books to take with me since I will have plenty of travel time on planes, buses and ferries!

I am taking ‘A Game of Thrones’ but don’t want to order the others until I’ve finished the first and know I’ll enjoy it.


So I am on the lookout for at least two other books, any suggestions? No romantic **** please.

All serious suggestions are appreciated.
 
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Irish Scouse

Bob Kelso. ❥
Aug 19, 2009
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Any preferences between fiction and non-fiction?

What about plays, would you read them?

Burial atThebes is a very good translated play.

Da vinci code i very good, if you haven't read it, only book of his tha I actually enjoy. 1984 by Orwell is another great, Catch-22, The Great Gatsby, The Grapes of Wrath, Wise Blood an Zen and the art of motorcycle maintainance are some ofmy favourites.

A Stolen Life: A Memoir is a autobiog I recently read -very, very good andengaging. Got Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eyewitness Account as a present, oneof the best autobiogs I've ever read.
 

TJD07

Member
Nov 6, 2010
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I took battle royale with me last time, good read if you liked the film.
I'm reading game of thrones this time oddly enough :p
 

Burkie7

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Jan 12, 2010
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Prob abit childish but The Curious Incident of the dog in the Night-Time is a great read.
 

Irish Scouse

Bob Kelso. ❥
Aug 19, 2009
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Oh, and I found the Butcher Boy to be very funny, all very well known but some of my favourites.
 

Alcaraz

Member
Jun 15, 2010
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A Very Private Gentleman by Martin Booth

Power Play by Joseph Finder

Godfather Series by Mario Puzo

I recommend these highly if you are looking for the 'thriller' type of books


Crisis Economics by Nouriel Roubini

Freakonomics

If you are an Econs kid these are good books too

It would help to know what type of books you are looking for :), I am an avid reader so I probably will be able to help you out
 

Billy

#THFC
Dec 7, 2008
7,306
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I enjoy the Darren Shan series'. They are considered 'Teen' books, but are good reads for young adults, in my opinion. I wouldn't bother with these if you don't enjoy Vampire/Demon related stories.

John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" is one of my favourite books, for a more 'serious' read, and Irvine Welsh's "Trainspotting".

How many you looking for? Has been a while since I read any new ones (besides the George R.R. Martin series, which is superb, you'll enjoy it) but I have a decent list of fiction books I can post for you.
 

Giggles

Member
May 2, 2010
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One book I would strongly reccomend if you like Sport Related and Drama type books is, 'Floodlit Dreams: How to save a football club' by Ian Ridley. Its a true story based on the financial troubles of Weymouth FC, and is actually a very exciting read.
 

Nixon

Member
Jan 19, 2010
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Not really sure what genre you're looking for so I'll just suggest a few (very different) books.

- Catch 22, as Irish Scouse said, is a great book, if slightly dark at times!

- I enjoyed 'Into Thin Air' by John Krakauer. It's a true story about a disaster while climbing Everest. Quite exciting.

- 'Dark Star Safari' by Paul Theroux is an interesting travel book about the author's journey overland from Cairo to Cape Town.

- 'Mosquito Coast' is another book by Paul Theroux which is entirely different to the other one I've listed. It's a fictional story about a man who uplifts his family and takes them to Central America, and gradually goes mad. I've made it sound rubbish, but it's good, honest! The Mosquito Coast: Amazon.co.uk: Paul Theroux: Books - That'll probably show it better.

- The series beginning with 'The girl with the dragon tattoo' is an addictive read, despite fairly rubbish. It's difficult to put them down - they're all gripping books.

- 'Behind the curtain' by Jonathan Wilson is about his travels to see football in Eastern Europe and the former USSR. It combines travel with some football history, and I found the combination enjoyable reading.

At the moment I'm reading 'Bad Blood' by Jeremy Whittle, but you probably won't like it unless you have a hidden liking for cycling...
 

Kris

Member
Sep 17, 2005
11,006
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Any preferences between fiction and non-fiction?

What about plays, would you read them?

Burial atThebes is a very good translated play.

Da vinci code i very good, if you haven't read it, only book of his tha I actually enjoy. 1984 by Orwell is another great, Catch-22, The Great Gatsby, The Grapes of Wrath, Wise Blood an Zen and the art of motorcycle maintainance are some ofmy favourites.

A Stolen Life: A Memoir is a autobiog I recently read -very, very good andengaging. Got Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eyewitness Account as a present, oneof the best autobiogs I've ever read.
I'm more of a fiction reader.

I took battle royale with me last time, good read if you liked the film.
I'm reading game of thrones this time oddly enough :p
Are you enjoying it? I've seen both Battle Royale movies & while I want to read the book, I'd rather read something completely new, if you get me?

I enjoy the Darren Shan series'. They are considered 'Teen' books, but are good reads for young adults, in my opinion. I wouldn't bother with these if you don't enjoy Vampire/Demon related stories.

John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" is one of my favourite books, for a more 'serious' read, and Irvine Welsh's "Trainspotting".

How many you looking for? Has been a while since I read any new ones (besides the George R.R. Martin series, which is superb, you'll enjoy it) but I have a decent list of fiction books I can post for you.
Looking for good fiction books Billy, not so keen on teen vampire stuff though.

Not really sure what genre you're looking for so I'll just suggest a few (very different) books.

- Catch 22, as Irish Scouse said, is a great book, if slightly dark at times!

- I enjoyed 'Into Thin Air' by John Krakauer. It's a true story about a disaster while climbing Everest. Quite exciting.

- 'Dark Star Safari' by Paul Theroux is an interesting travel book about the author's journey overland from Cairo to Cape Town.

- 'Mosquito Coast' is another book by Paul Theroux which is entirely different to the other one I've listed. It's a fictional story about a man who uplifts his family and takes them to Central America, and gradually goes mad. I've made it sound rubbish, but it's good, honest! The Mosquito Coast: Amazon.co.uk: Paul Theroux: Books - That'll probably show it better.

- The series beginning with 'The girl with the dragon tattoo' is an addictive read, despite fairly rubbish. It's difficult to put them down - they're all gripping books.

- 'Behind the curtain' by Jonathan Wilson is about his travels to see football in Eastern Europe and the former USSR. It combines travel with some football history, and I found the combination enjoyable reading.

At the moment I'm reading 'Bad Blood' by Jeremy Whittle, but you probably won't like it unless you have a hidden liking for cycling...
I loved the Millenium Trilogy :wub: very exciting read.


I appreciate the suggestions guys, so far nothing has really caught my eye though.
 

BeadSTARR

Member
Jan 13, 2009
1,120
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0
The Stephen Fry autobiography 1 & 2 are very interesting. Im not much of a book person to be honest, but those two have been a really good read.
 

Dunc

Keyboard Warrior
Dec 3, 2009
10,699
0
36
If you like detective books with a bit of action and humour, you should try some Robert Crais's Elvis Cole/Joe Pike books, you can find a list of them here. I have read them all, really enjoyed them all, but I would recommend reading them in order so you can relate better to the characters in later books. All the books are really gripping, and I have laughed out loud, much to the amusement of surrounding people, many times while reading these.
 

Raikan007

Member
Feb 6, 2009
20,599
4
38
Have you watched the film Limitless? I've not but just read the book and that was good
the movie is very shallow and lacks depth/character, the book was good, the movie was ****! could have been a lot better even though I like Bradley Cooper...
 

Average Joe

Member
May 25, 2009
7,421
9
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31
the movie is very shallow and lacks depth/character, the book was good, the movie was ****! could have been a lot better even though I like Bradley Cooper...
Ah right thats a shame, I bout the book on Kindle for 79p and enjoyed it, will still probably watch the film at some point though ;)
 

W4FC B3N

Member
Jan 10, 2011
2,832
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Swimsuit by James Patterson, best book I've ever read!!

Prologue

JUST THE FACTS
I KNOW THINGS I don’t want to know.
A true psychopathic killer is nothing like your everyday garden-variety murderer. Not like a holdup guy who panics and unloads his gun into a hapless liquor store clerk, or a man who bursts into his stockbroker’s office and blows his head off, and he’s not like a husband who strangles his wife over a real or imagined affair.
Psychopaths aren’t motivated by love or fear or rage or hatred. They don’t feel those emotions.
They don’t feel anything at all. Trust me on that one.
Gacy, Bundy, Dahmer, BTK, and the other all-stars in the twisted-killer league were detached, driven by sexual pleasure and the thrill of the kill. If you thought you saw remorse in Ted Bundy’s eyes after he’d confessed to killing thirty young women, it was in your own mind, because what distinguishes psychopaths from all other killers is that they don’t care at all. Not about their victims’ lives. Not about their deaths.
But psychopaths can pretend to care. They mimic human emotion to pass among us and to lure their prey. Closer and closer. And after they’ve killed, it’s on to the next new and better thrill, with no boundaries, no taboos, no holds barred.
I’ve been told that it’s “distracting” to be so consumed by appetite, and so psychopaths screw up.
Sometimes they make a mistake.
You may remember back to the spring of 2008 when the swimsuit model Kim McDaniels was abducted from a sandy beach in Hawaii. No ransom demand was ever made. The local cops were slow, arrogant, and clueless, and there were no witnesses or informants who had any idea who had kidnapped that beautiful and talented young woman.
At that time, I was an ex-cop turned mystery writer, but since my last book had gone almost straight from the shipping carton to the remainder racks, I was a third-strike novelist doing the next best thing to writing pulp fiction.
I was reporting crime for the L.A. Times, which, on the upside, was how the highly successful novelist Michael Connelly got his start.
I was at my desk twenty-four hours after Kim went missing. I was filing yet another routinely tragic story of a drive-by fatality when my editor, Daniel Aronstein, leaned into my cube, said “Catch,” and tossed me a ticket to Maui.
I was almost forty then, going numb from crime scene fatigue, still telling myself that I was perfectly positioned to hook a book idea that would turn my life around one more time. It was a lie I believed because it anchored my fraying hope for a better future.
The weird thing is, when the big idea called me out — I never saw it coming.
Aronstein’s ticket to Hawaii gave me a much-needed hit. I sensed a five-star boondoggle, featuring oceanfront bars and half-naked girls. And I saw myself jousting with the competition — all that, and the L.A. Times was picking up the tab.
 
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